Join My Newsletter

Mona Delahooke PhD logo

Mona’s Blog

TAG: Mindful Parenting

The information contained on this blog is not a substitute for training, continuing education, clinical supervision, or the importance of individual consultation for each child and family. All identifying information, including names and other details, has been changed to protect the privacy of individuals.

Recently I experienced a difficult moment with a young client—and gained some insight in the process.

In the midst of a session in my office, something triggered the 8-year-old boy into a “red zone” and he suddenly burst out yelling and screaming. His mother and I had seen this happen before, and we typically reacted [...]

Read Full Article

Joy is a powerful tool for solving childhood challenges and promoting brain health. Yet in our culture of doing, teaching, treating and pathologizing, too often we forget that when a child needs help, the first thing we should increase is joy.  This is certainly true in my own field, child psychology, in which we often [...]

Read Full Article

Charlie’s parents felt like they were walking on eggshells.

A simple family party often set off the three year-old. The unfamiliar setting, the commotion, and relatives trying to hug and kiss the boy could easily send him into a kicking and screaming fit. Usually quiet, Charlie routinely burst into tantrums for reasons neither his parents nor [...]

Read Full Article

Are we doing children a disservice by insisting on mind over matter? Some food for thought on how to tailor encouragement to suit each child's unique needs.

Read Full Article

We can shift our mindset from viewing ODD as manipulative behavior to seeing it as an indicator that the child’s physiological state has shifted to distress, leading to fight or flight behaviors.

Read Full Article

A recent parenting study shed light on something so simple yet so profound that it may be one of the best gifts you can give yourself and your child.

Read Full Article

Early intervention should not be a race against developmental delays, but rather a thoughtful path to nurture each child’s own potential to develop at his or her own pace. A fast pace that emphasizes doing rather than being with a child can interfere with what children need most: an engaged and relaxed parent.

Read Full Article

Scroll Up